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Beware! Selfie Can Land You in Trouble – Arab News

28 May
via Roberto Sohmidt/AFP via cnn.com/not related to Arab News

via Roberto Sohmidt/AFP via cnn.com/not related to Arab News

YOU do not need to dress up, add any touches to the way you look to snap it. Whether in formal or informal situations, in a bathroom or in a meeting room, in a wedding or at a funeral, your commonsense and good judgment is the only thing that could stop from taking your phone out, extend your arms and take a selfie.

If the name of the game is social media networks these days, then a selfie is a major player in that game.
“Selfie” found its way to the dictionary in 2013 when the online version of Oxford Dictionary accepted it as a new word in the English language. The word means a self-portrait, a very common expression between photographers. 

Some of the resources suggest that the first ever self-portrait or selfie, was taken in the 19th Century, in 1839 by Robert Cornelius, an US photographer to be more exact.

However, the act of taking self photos, a lot of them, was getting popular along with the popularity of social media platforms themselves. Such photos started to appear repeatedly on MySpace and Facebook during the last decade. The exact word, selfie, began to appear in 2005, and some resources connect the term to the US designer and photographer Jim Krause.

As social media networks like Instagram, Twitter, Tumbler and Path got famous the word also gained popularity. By the end of 2012, selfie was chosen as one of the top 10 buzzwords by the Time Magazine.

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To Love, Or Not To Love One’s Job – Arab News

26 May
via digitalart/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

via digitalart/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

Even if I want to, it would be impossible to count the times I hear the phrase “employment is the new slavery.” It is repeatedly used, especially by self-proclaimed entrepreneurs and “get a better life” coaches; it is recited with such confidence resembling a talk about a scientifically proven fact, and audience are accepting it as if it is the ultimate truth of life.

This approach to work usually comes hand in hand with another popular advice “do what you love,” hinting that happiness and self fulfillment are impossible to achieve unless a person decided to do what he loves, as a profession.

Such argument begs a very basic question: Why do we have to work in the first place? There are a lot of theories and discussions trying to answer this question; the shortest answer is … necessity. A person needs to work because “it is necessary” for him to earn an income to support himself and his family, and one has to work to keep society functioning; “it is necessary” for the individuals living in that society to work and be productive. Whether an electrician, a CEO, a waiter, or an actor, you submit to the exact same force of necessity. Even if you present yourself as an entrepreneur who started from zero, at the end of the day, you should be providing something others need and they simply pay you for it; the very basic building block of modern economy.

Now, encompassing “the necessity to work” in such emotional format could be misleading. What does it mean to love your job anyway? You enjoy doing it, you might respond. In other words, believers in such mantra are saying that it is your “own pleasure” that should dictate the necessity of you to work, not the value you are adding, not the difference you are making in the society. Do not you think it is narcissistic tendency that deems a job likeable only due to the pleasant feeling it produces! Miya Tokumitsu in her article in the Jacobin Magazine, “In the name of love,” wrote, “While ‘do what you love’ sounds harmless and precious, it is ultimately self-focused to the point of narcissism.”

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Do You Know Everything About Social Media? – Arab News

20 May
via stockimages/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

via stockimages/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

HOW many social media platforms do you subscribe to? An easy bet would be saying that you are subscribed to 3-5 platforms. You are aware of the most popular ones in the region and in the rest of the world: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Path, and WhatsApp. 

However, you might be shocked over the actual number of social networking websites and applications available out there. It is a whole universe of them and the ones we are familiar with are like a couple of planets in a huge galaxy. Networks built around music, movies, languages, comics and books are just few examples.

What I am trying to say here is that do not assume that you know everything about social media networks, actually, no one does! This fact is of great importance if you are using social media platforms in your business. 

Social media platforms are dynamic; not only they are evolving, but their users’ behavior is also continuously changing. 

From time to time, findings of various researches surprise us, requiring us to rethink, to re-examine our understanding of the networks we think we are so familiar with.

One of the findings came about a year ago. Believe it or not, the fastest growing demographic on Twitter is not teenagers or young adults as you might assume, it is the adults between the ages of 55 to 64 years. This demographic has grown by 79 percent since 2012.

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Make Libraries Part of Our Culture – Arab News

19 May
via Phaitoon/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

via Phaitoon/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

I have a confession to make; I have not been to a public library since my graduation from the university and that was around 10 years ago. For someone who loves books and reading, I find that embarrassing if not shocking.

However, in my defense, and on behalf of all book lovers in the Kingdom, it is not in our hands. The sad truth is that public libraries are not part of our infrastructure or should I dare say they are not part of our culture!

If science and literature have homes, then it is these libraries. Between those walls embracing thousands of books, neatly arranged on shelves, wonder is born; the love to discover, to create, to travel between pages, to sit quietly and open your minds and souls to new knowledge, is developed. 

In the libraries, talents are sharpened, ideas shaped, experiments designed and a pact for loving knowledge is forged. 
“It isn’t just a library,” Isaac Asimov, the distinguished American writer once said, “It is a space ship that will take you to the farthest reaches of the universe, a time machine that will take you to the far past and the far future, a teacher that knows more than any human being, a friend that will amuse you and console you — and most of all, a gateway, to a better and happier and more useful life.”

The relationship between a Saudi and a library is, let’s put it this way, anemic. Back to the school days, the school library is a luxury not all schools can afford. If you were not a student in a private school, or a public school with a moderate library, most probably you have not been to a library till you became a university student. And even if your school hosted a library, I bet the relationship between you and the school library is surrounded by a lot of fear and bureaucratic prominence. I remember been a couple of times only to the library in my public intermediate school, and every time I’ve been there with my fellow students, it was like visiting a nuclear plant; do not touch anything, stay away from this and that. Schools keep those libraries for prestige rather than for educational purposes. They know that if anything happened to those libraries, they will never get the required budget to maintain them or uplift them.

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Social Media and ‘The Culture of Humiliation’ – Arab News

15 May
via Stuart Miles/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

via Stuart Miles/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

Monica Lewinsky — does it ring a bell? If you were born in the 90s, then the name might not mean a lot to you, but if you were born before that, then I am sure it does. Lewinsky was the star of the most sensational story the world had witnessed in its recent history; the story of the illicit relationship between a White House intern and the most powerful man living in that house, the president of the United States, himself!

After about 10 years since her last public appearance, Lewinsky is back with an article she wrote for the Vanity Fair magazine. In the article, she discusses the consequences of the scandal that she had to deal with and live through all these years. Of course, this is not the reason such a story would make it to a page like this talking about technology and social media. It is here because she touched, so eloquently, a very hot topic that is related to social media in her article; a topic she called “the culture of humiliation.”

In her article, she described a situation in a Copper Union event, back in 2001, where she was “thunderstruck” by a comment so humiliating made in such a public setup, and she takes that as a starting point to tackle how such a comment would have been different if it was made in today’s world where social media is the name of the game.

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Studying Pros and Cons of Digital Activism – Arab News

15 May
via Stuart Miles/freedigitalmedia.net/not related to Arab News

via Stuart Miles/freedigitalmedia.net/not related to Arab News

While going through your Twitter in the morning, a hashtag could stop you for a second. The next moment you would be participating, either cheering or bashing the cause. As it starts in seconds, it ends in a similar fashion and one moves on with the rest of his/her day feeling good about taking part in some national or international cause.

Digital activism, or cyber activism, is defined as the use of Internet tools, especially of social media platforms like blogs, Facebook, Twitter, etc, to promote certain ideas and gather support around certain causes.

Some of these causes are international, they call for that distinct human nature to appear and gather around. The abduction of schoolgirls in Nigeria can be cited as a good example. Within a few days, the hashtag supporting the case (#BringBackOurGirls) has been tweeted and re-tweeted millions of times. A lot of political figures and celebrities jumped in the stream, calling for justice, alerting for human trafficking and discussing women rights. 

The other type of causes is usually ideological; promoting certain ideas and ethical codes. Such issues stir controversies and randomly lead to deep reflection and fruitful discussions. 

However, there is one theme that mostly all digital activism causes fall under; they are subjective. They appear on the public radar once certain celebrities or influential people adopt them. Interestingly, it is a mechanism so similar to how classical media functions; there are few “subjective” reports that make the headlines. 

Boko Haram, the group behind the abduction of girls in Nigeria, again serves as a good example. While the group caught world attention because of the innocent girls involved, similar cases have never been able to gather such momentum because simply influential people did not highlight them. 

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Twitter Needs Drastic Changes to Regain its Charm – Arab News

15 May
via marin/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

via marin/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

A few days ago, a renowned US magazine the Atlantic published an interesting article about the “death” of Twitter; it called it “Eulogy for Twitter.”

The article discussed and assessed trends and the fast-changing phases the social media is going through that seem to be taking it to the grave; the grave of the Internet hypes that once been around and now left us to be part of history, alive in the memories of their used-to-be users (there is no better example than MySpace). 

Frankly, the article seems to be striking a chord with a lot of Twitter users, especially those who witnessed its rise back in 2010. 
Twitter was quieter back then. It felt like the place where you went to find interesting people, discussing interesting stuff. You could easily find a group of people who shared your interests, your passion about something. 

It was somehow intimate, more personal, easy to belong to and easier to meet new ideas and new minds. I personally made a number of good friends during that period.

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It’s a Dream come True – Arab News

15 May
via http://www.oc1oc.com/?p=2075/ not related to Arab News

via http://www.oc1oc.com/?p=2075/ not related to Arab News

For a long time, Jeddawis had been dreaming of a new stadium where they could see their favorite teams, Al-Ahli and Al-Ittihad, lock horns. This long awaited dream became a reality with the inauguration of the King Abdullah Sports City last Thursday.

The beautifully designed structure made in the shape of a jewel marks a new beginning in the history of Saudi sports that has not seen a major addition to its infrastructure for quite some time. 

Although the opening ceremony itself was successful, I am not sure it is possible to say the same about the overall organization of the event.

It all started before Thursday, when the free entrance to the event was announced with tickets available at post offices. Unfortunately, it was a recipe for disaster. The inexperienced organizing team of the event met the unprepared post office services!

This decision created a mess within the first few hours of the distribution day; chaotic offices, uncoordinated staff and long queues of people suffering the suffocating heat and humidity. Crowds have their fair share of the blame as well, let’s admit it, we are not used to queuing and dealing with situations that require patience and discipline, but truth be told, there was nothing in the tickets’ distribution that made any organization inevitable.

The irony is that despite the chaos and long hours under the sun, the tickets carried no value at all on the main day! Thousands upon thousands marched on foot toward the gates of the stadium and were able to pass without a second glance from anyone. The seats marked with numbers proved to be useless, it was first come, first ‘have a seat’ kind of way! 

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Is it Necessary to Curb Freedom on YouTube Productions? – Arab News

15 May
via winnond/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

via winnond/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

The relative freedom of Saudi YouTubers seems to be coming to an end, as the authorities, represented by the General Commission for Audiovisual Media, are taking serious steps to closely monitor the Saudi productions on YouTube.

Apparently, filming one’s own shows, uploading them to YouTube and making them available to millions to watch will not remain as easy as it is now. To be able to do that, one will soon be required to get registered and obtain a license to do carry on with those activities.

The story of YouTube in the Kingdom goes hand in hand with Twitter; as both the social media platforms found a huge fan base in the young generation of the Kingdom. The Kingdom has witnessed huge growth of Twitter and Saudi viewers watch three times as much YouTube as Americans, according to Google.

A number of young Saudis found themselves labeled as the “New Media Superstars” mere months after their YouTube shows attracted millions upon millions of viewers. They started new businesses and production companies dedicated to YouTube shows. Suddenly, the booming number of Saudi shows became the talk of the country. The way these shows were produced and presented to the Saudi viewers, based mainly on comedy, with young people talking in a simple language, presenting our daily problems in comical sketches and scenes, came in contrast to the typical Saudi shows, making an instant rift between the image of the official, old- fashioned media and what became to be known as “the new media.”

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Leadership and Management Skills are Two Different Things – Arab News

15 May
via stockimages/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

via stockimages/freedigitalphotos.net/not related to Arab News

AN engineer had replaced a doctor at the top position of the Ministry of Health at this very critical time of battling MERS coronavirus. Honestly, I did not cheer up once the decision was announced. I thought that a practicing doctor was fit to deal with such a situation. I voiced that out in a tweet when I a friend of mine, a doctor himself, replied to me that “the MoH is in need of a leader and that is something very hard to find in doctors!”

A controversial statement I am sure. And I trust that he did not mean, in anyway, that doctors are not or cannot be leaders. Doctors are entrusted to make tough decision about their patients’ lives and be in charge whenever they step in his or her clinic. Dr. Al-Rabeeah, the former health minister, is an extraordinary surgeon with an international reputation in the field of separating conjoined twins. A man like him is expected to be a leader in the operation room, directing the team, making decisions and standing side by side with all his staff in those critical moments.

However, the leadership that my doctor friend was talking about is a different kind of leadership. It is the kind acting Health Minister Adel Fakeih has demonstrated in the few days after taking over the position.

Right away, he embarked on field visits to different health institutions, he approached the media with a different tone “we will be very transparent in our efforts to combat the virus,” something that was painfully missed in the former managing team, he appointed a specialized adviser in his team, and he is openly discussing plans and strategies with the public.

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